cover of book
 

Bureaucrats
by Honore De Balzac
edited by Marco Diani
translated by Charles Foulkes
Northwestern University Press, 1993
Paper: 978-0-8101-0987-2 | Cloth: 978-0-8101-0973-5
Library of Congress Classification PQ2165.E4613 1993
Dewey Decimal Classification 843.7

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
The Bureaucrats (Les Employes) stands out in Balzac's immense Human Comedy by concentrating precisely and penetratingly on a distinctive "modern" institution: France's state bureaucracy. Rabourdin, aided by his unscrupulous wife, attempts to reorganize and streamline the entire system. Rabourdin's plan will halve the government's size while doubling its revenue. When the plan is leaked, Rabourdin's rival--an utter incompetent--gains the overwhelming support of the frightened and desperate body of low-ranking functionaries.

The novel contains the recognizable themes of Balzac's work: obsessive ambition, conspiracy and human pettiness, and a melodramatic struggle between the social good and the evils of folly and stupidity. It is also an unusual, dramatized analysis of a developing political institution and its role in shaping social class and mentality.

See other books on: 19th century | Bureaucrats | Classics | Diani, Marco | France
See other titles from Northwestern University Press

Reference metadata exposed for Zotero via unAPI.