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The Right To Privacy: Gays, Lesbians, and the Constitution
by Vincent Samar
Temple University Press, 1992
Paper: 978-0-87722-952-0 | eISBN: 978-1-4399-0378-0 | Cloth: 978-0-87722-796-0
Library of Congress Classification KF1262.S26 1991
Dewey Decimal Classification 342.730858

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

Where did the right to privacy come from and what does it mean? Grappling with the critical issues involving women and gays that relate to the recent Supreme Court appointment, Vincent J. Samar develops a definition of legal privacy, discusses the reasons why and the degree to which privacy should be protected, and shows the relationship between privacy and personal autonomy. He answers former Supreme Court nominee Robert Bork’s questions about scope, content, and legal justification for a general right to privacy and emphasizes issues involving gays and lesbians, Samar maintains that these privacy issues share a common constitutional-ethical underpinning with issues such as abortion, surrogate motherhood, drug testing, and the right to die.



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