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Apostles of Change: Latino Radical Politics, Church Occupations, and the Fight to Save the Barrio
by Felipe Hinojosa
University of Texas Press, 2021
Cloth: 978-1-4773-2198-0 | eISBN: 978-1-4773-2201-7 | Paper: 978-1-4773-2199-7
Library of Congress Classification HN49.R33H55 2021
Dewey Decimal Classification 303.484

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK

2021 Finalist Raul Yzaguirre Best Political/Current Affairs Book, International Latino Book Awards


Winner of the Texas Association of Chicanos in Higher Education Inaugural Book Award


In the late 1960s, the American city found itself in steep decline. An urban crisis fueled by federal policy wreaked destruction and displacement on poor and working-class families. The urban drama included religious institutions, themselves undergoing fundamental change, that debated whether to stay in the city or move to the suburbs. Against the backdrop of the Black and Brown Power movements, which challenged economic inequality and white supremacy, young Latino radicals began occupying churches and disrupting services to compel church communities to join their protests against urban renewal, poverty, police brutality, and racism.


Apostles of Change tells the story of these occupations and establishes their context within the urban crisis; relates the tensions they created; and articulates the activists' bold, new vision for the church and the world. Through case studies from Chicago, Los Angeles, New York City, and Houston, Felipe Hinojosa reveals how Latino freedom movements frequently crossed boundaries between faith and politics and argues that understanding the history of these radical politics is essential to understanding the dynamic changes in Latino religious groups from the late 1960s to the early 1980s.


See other books on: Change | Christianity and politics | Hispanic Americans | Radicalism | Urban renewal
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