cover of book
 

Intimate Eating: Racialized Spaces and Radical Futures
by Anita Mannur
Duke University Press, 2022
eISBN: 978-1-4780-2244-2 | Cloth: 978-1-4780-1520-8 | Paper: 978-1-4780-1782-0
Library of Congress Classification GT2850.M366 2022

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | REVIEWS | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
In Intimate Eating Anita Mannur examines how notions of the culinary can create new forms of kinship, intimacy, and social and political belonging. Drawing on critical ethnic studies and queer studies, Mannur traces the ways in which people of color, queer people, and other marginalized subjects create and sustain this belonging through the formation of “intimate eating publics.” These spaces—whether established in online communities or through eating along in a restaurant—blur the line between public and private. In analyses of Julie Powell’s Julie and Julia, Nani Power’s Ginger and Ganesh, Ritesh Batra’s film The Lunchbox, Michael Rakowitz’s performance art installation Enemy Kitchen, and The Great British Bake Off, Mannur focuses on how racialized South Asian and Arab brown bodies become visible in various intimate eating publics. In this way, the culinary becomes central to discourses of race and other social categories of difference. By illuminating how cooking, eating, and distributing food shapes and sustains social worlds, Mannur reconfigures how we think about networks of intimacy beyond the family, heteronormativity, and nation.

See other books on: Asian Americans | Cross-cultural studies | Essays & Narratives | Food | Food habits
See other titles from Duke University Press
Nearby on shelf for Manners and customs (General) / Customs relative to private life: