cover of book
 

BUY FROM PUBLISHER


Available as an ebook at:
OverDrive



Artificial Southerner: Equivocations and Love Songs
by Philip Martin
University of Arkansas Press, 2001
eISBN: 978-1-61075-047-9 | Paper: 978-1-55728-716-8
Library of Congress Classification F216.2.M37 2001
Dewey Decimal Classification 975.043

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
The Artificial Southerner tracks the manifestations and ramifications of "Southern identity"—the relationship among a self-conscious, invented regionalism, the real distinctiveness of Southern culture, and the influence of the South in America. In these essays columnist Philip Martin explores the region and those who have both fled and embraced it. He offers lyric portraits of Southerners real, imagined, and absentee: musicians (James Brown, the Rolling Stones, Johnny Cash), writers (Richard Ford, Eudora Welty), politicians (Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter). He also considers such topics as the architecture of E. Fay Jones, the biracial nature of country music, and the idea of "white trash." "Every American has a South within," he says, "a conquered territory, an old wound . . . a scar." His work meditates on the rock and roll, the literature, the life, and the love which proceed from that inner, self-created South.

See other books on: 1865- | Group identity | Martin, Philip | Popular culture | Southern States
See other titles from University of Arkansas Press
Nearby on shelf for United States local history / The South. South Atlantic States: