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Street Addicts in the Political Economy
by Alisse Waterston
Temple University Press, 1997
Paper: 978-1-56639-574-8 | eISBN: 978-1-4399-0416-9 | Cloth: 978-0-87722-992-6
Library of Congress Classification HV5825.W3814 1993
Dewey Decimal Classification 305.90824

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
In this book, Alisse Waterston reveals the economic, political, and ideological forces that shape the nature of street-addict life. Disputing the view that hard-core, low-income drug users are social marginals situated in deviant subcultures, the author dispels popular images of the mythic, dark dope fiend haunting our city streets. Using dramatic, first-person accounts from New York City addicts, Waterston analyzes their position in the social structure, the kind of work -- both legal and illegal -- they perform, and their relations with family, friends, and lovers. She presents a moving account of daily life from the addict's point of view and demonstrates how addicts are structurally vulnerable to the larger sociocultural system within which they live.

See other books on: Drug addicts | Drug use | Homeless persons | Political Economy | Waterston, Alisse
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