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The Protestant Temperament: Patterns of Child-Rearing, Religious Experience, and the Self in Early America
by Philip Greven
University of Chicago Press, 1988
Paper: 978-0-226-30830-2
Library of Congress Classification BR515.G75 1988
Dewey Decimal Classification 305.6

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Bringing together an extraordinary richness of evidence—from letters, diaries, and other intimate family records of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries—Philip Greven explores the strikingly distinctive ways in which Protestant children were reared in America. In tracing the hidden continuities of religious experience, of attitudes toward God, children, the self, sexuality, pleasure, virtue, and achievement, Greven identifies three distinct Protestant temperaments prevailing among Americans at the time: the Evangelical, the Moderate, and the General. The Protestant Temperament is a powerful reassessment of the role of child-rearing and religion in early American life.

See other books on: Child development | Early America | Patterns | Protestantism | Self
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