HISTORY OF ILLINOIS: FROM ITS COMMENCEMENT AS A STATE IN 1818
by Thomas Ford
University of Illinois Press, 1995
Cloth: 978-0-252-02140-4
Library of Congress Classification F545.F7 1995
Dewey Decimal Classification 977.303

ABOUT THIS BOOK
ABOUT THIS BOOK
"Davis writes with an authority derived from his own perceptive
        studies of Illinois during the Jackson period. His account is balanced
        and critical while at the same time recognizing the value of Ford's book."
        -- Robert W. Johannsen, J. G. Randall Distinguished Professor of History,
        University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
      Both cynical and self-serving, Illinois's seventh governor Thomas Ford
        also possessed an unrivaled sensitivity to the dynamics of frontier life.
        He reveals these and other qualities in his classic A History of Illinois,
        which covers the state's first thirty years.
      Ford writes with candor of the lengthy "Hancock County difficulties"
        and the ouster of Mormons from the state. His treatment of the Black Hawk
        War and his writings on the slavery controversy in the state, the murder
        of Elijah Lovejoy, and the larger issues of violence and vigilantism help
        show why this volume has been called the outstanding early survey of Illinois
        history. This reissue of Ford's book includes an introduction by Rodney
        O. Davis and a publication history by Terence Tanner.
 

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