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Bullets and Fire: Lynching and Authority in Arkansas, 1840-1950
by Guy Lancaster
University of Arkansas Press, 2017
Paper: 978-1-68226-044-9 | eISBN: 978-1-61075-622-8
Library of Congress Classification HV6465.A8B85 2018

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Bullets and Fire is the first collection on lynching in Arkansas, exploring all corners of the state from the time of slavery up to the mid-twentieth century and covering stories of the perpetrators, victims, and those who fought against vigilante violence.

Among the topics discussed are the lynching of slaves, the Arkansas Council of the Association of Southern Women for the Prevention of Lynching, the 1927 lynching of John Carter in Little Rock, and the state’s long opposition to a federal anti-lynching law.

Throughout, the work reveals how the phenomenon of lynching—as the means by which a system of white supremacy reified itself, with its perpetrators rarely punished and its defenders never condemned—served to construct authority in Arkansas. Bullets and Fire will add depth to the growing body of literature on American lynching and integrate a deeper understanding of this violence into Arkansas history.

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