cover of book
 

Vision, Science and Literature, 1870-1920: Ocular Horizons
by Martin Willis
University of Pittsburgh Press, 2011
eISBN: 978-0-8229-8190-9 | Cloth: 978-1-84893-234-0 | Paper: 978-0-8229-6546-6
Library of Congress Classification QP475.W575 2011
Dewey Decimal Classification 612.8409034

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC | REQUEST ACCESSIBLE FILE
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Winner of the British Society for Literature and Science Annual Prize, 2011

Winner of the Cultural Studies in English Prize, 2012

This book explores the role of vision and the culture of observation in Victorian and modernist ways of seeing. Willis charts the characterization of vision through four organizing principles—small, large, past and future—to survey Victorian conceptions of what vision was. He then explores how this Victorian vision influenced twentieth-century ways of seeing, when anxieties over visual "truth" became entwined with modernist rejections of objectivity.

 

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