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A Nation of Immigrants Reconsidered: US Society in an Age of Restriction, 1924-1965
edited by Maddalena Marinari, Madeline Hsu and Maria Cristina Garcia
University of Illinois Press, 2019
eISBN: 978-0-252-05095-4 | Paper: 978-0-252-08396-9 | Cloth: 978-0-252-04221-8
Library of Congress Classification JV6455.N37 2019
Dewey Decimal Classification 305.906912097309

ABOUT THIS BOOK | AUTHOR BIOGRAPHY | TOC
ABOUT THIS BOOK
Scholars, journalists, and policymakers have long argued that the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act dramatically reshaped the demographic composition of the United States. In A Nation of Immigrants Reconsidered, leading scholars of immigration explore how the political and ideological struggles of the so-called "age of restriction"--from 1924 to 1965--paved the way for the changes to come. The essays examine how geopolitics, civil rights, perceptions of America's role as a humanitarian sanctuary, and economic priorities led government officials to facilitate the entrance of specific immigrant groups, thereby establishing the legal precedents for future policies. Eye-opening articles discuss Japanese war brides and changing views of miscegenation, the recruitment of former Nazi scientists, a temporary workers program with Japanese immigrants, the emotional separation of Mexican immigrant families, Puerto Rican youth's efforts to claim an American identity, and the restaurant raids of conscripted Chinese sailors during World War II. Contributors: Eiichiro Azuma, David Cook-Martín, David FitzGerald, Monique Laney, Heather Lee, Kathleen López, Laura Madokoro, Ronald L. Mize, Arissa H. Oh, Ana Elizabeth Rosas, Lorrin Thomas, Ruth Ellen Wasem, and Elliott Young.
Nearby on shelf for Colonies and colonization. Emigration and immigration. International migration / Emigration and immigration. International migration / United States: