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On Robert Antelme's The Human Race: Essays and Commentary
edited by Daniel Dobbels
by Robert Antelme
translated by Jeffrey Haight
Northwestern University Press, 2003
Cloth: 978-0-8101-6063-7 | Paper: 978-0-8101-6064-4
Library of Congress Classification D805.G3A7513 2003
Dewey Decimal Classification 940.547243094322

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ABOUT THIS BOOK
Rescued in 1945 from Dachau--where François Mitterand, his onetime comrade in the resistance, recognized him among the thousands of quarantined prisoners--Robert Antelme set out to do what seemed "unimaginable," to describe not only his experience but the humanity of his captors. The result, The Human Race, was called by George Perec "the finest example in contemporary French writing of what literature can be."

In this volume, the extraordinary nature and extent of Robert Antelme's accomplishment, and of the reverberations he set in motion in French life and literature, finds eloquent expression. The pieces Antelme wrote for journals--including essays on "principles put to the test," man as the "basis of right," and the question of revenge--appear here alongside appreciations of The Human Race by authors from Perec to Maurice Blanchot to Sarah Kofman. Also included are Antelme's personal recollections and interviews with, among others, Dionys Mascolo (who brought Antelme back from Dachau), Marguerite Duras (Antelme's wife, who tells of his return from Germany), and Mitterand.

Also available: Antelme's The Human Race

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