A Legend for the Legendary: The Origin of the Baseball Hall of Fame
by James A. Vlasich
University of Wisconsin Press, 1990
Paper: 978-0-87972-494-8
Library of Congress Classification GV863.A1V57 1990
Dewey Decimal Classification 796.3570973

ABOUT THIS BOOK
ABOUT THIS BOOK

The origins of baseball are controversial. James A. Vlasich discusses the debates between two men intimately involved in nineteenth-century baseball, Henry Chadwick and Albert G. Spalding. Abner Graves of the Mills Commission claimed that Abner Doubleday had invented the game and he had done it in Cooperstown, New York. This claim was scrutinized at the time but the myth became etched into baseball history.
    Through the years, however, some critics have questioned the Mills Commission report. The problem is that the Baseball Hall of Fame is built on this shaky foundation. The lack of diligence on the part of Spalding’s self-appointed committee has led to a credibility gap for the baseball shrine that continues a half century after its dedication. Indeed, the story of the building of the Baseball Hall of Fame is filled with intrigue worthy of a political thriller.


See other books on: History | Origin | Popular Culture | Social Science
See other titles from University of Wisconsin Press
Nearby on shelf for Recreation. Leisure / Sports / Ball games: Baseball, football, golf, etc.: