cover of book
 

Suspect Citizens: Women, Virtue, and Vice in Backlash Politics
by Jocelyn Boryczka
Temple University Press, 2012
eISBN: 978-1-4399-0895-2 | Paper: 978-1-4399-0894-5 | Cloth: 978-1-4399-0893-8
Library of Congress Classification HQ1236.5.U6B67 2012
Dewey Decimal Classification 320.082

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ABOUT THIS BOOK

What drives the cycle of backlashes against women’s ongoing struggle for equality, freedom, and inclusion in American politics? In her innovative and provocative book, Suspect Citizens, Jocelyn Boryczka presents a feminist conceptual history that shows how American politics have largely defined women in terms of their reproductive and socializing functions. This framework not only denies women full citizenship, but also devalues the active political engagement of all citizens who place each other and their government under suspicion.


Developing the gendered dynamics of virtue and vice, Boryczka exposes the paradox of how women are perceived as both virtuous moral guardians and vice-ridden suspect citizens capable of jeopardizing the entire nation’s exceptional future. She uses wide-ranging examples from the Puritans and contemporary debates over sex education to S&M lesbian feminists and the ethics of care to show how to move beyond virtue and vice to a democratic feminist ethics.


Suspect Citizens advances a politics of collective responsibility and belonging.



See other books on: Feminist ethics | Political activity | Political participation | Vice | Virtue
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